Holly Margerison
11 September 2012

Future Morph website re-launched

Over the last 20 years we have seen dramatic changes occurring within the environment and the world around us, highlighting the need for an increase in the science workforce and those with science skills.

Early September saw the re-launch of the Future Morph website – a resource for students, teachers and parents which aims to redefine perceptions of the careers arising from studying science and maths.

Future Morph is the Science Council’s website designed to show that studying science and maths beyond the age of 16 isn’t just a one track road to a life in a lab – the skills and knowledge you gain are valuable in almost any career and will make you very employable.

The main features and layout of the site will remain the same, but the visuals and navigation have been improved to make it easier for users to find specific items. New features include a new blog page and a number of ongoing new themed areas.

To coincide with the re-launch of Future Morph, the site will also house a brand new database of careers information links – the development of which has been led by the National STEM Centre. This will include all existing resources from the Future Morph database as well as a huge range of other resources from the eLibrary and other web portals, including websites, videos, resources and podcasts covering information, advice and guidance, career planning, job profiles, case studies, games and quizzes. Users will be able to search resources via target age, resource format, content partner, subject or tags in order to find the resource most appropriate for them.

New themed sections are currently in development to add a new dimension to the site. These will include Water, Food, Travel & tourism, Computers & IT, Imagining Different Tomorrows, Space, and Disasters (Natural Hazards).

Over the last 20 years we have seen dramatic changes occurring within the environment and the world around us, highlighting the need for an increase in the science workforce and those with science skills. The majority of people do realise that science is becoming increasingly important, but do they also realise that we will need a significant corresponding increase in the numbers of those with STEM skills who are able to tackle these high profile issues?

Who knows where science might take us in the next 10, 20 or even 50 years…The answers to these questions all lie with the future science workforce.

We must ensure that young people are given the opportunities to see that the science that they learn in school does have relevance to everyday life; can offer them a wide variety of career opportunities; and can open doors for them to a rewarding future career.