Improving indoor air quality

Publication date:
June 2021

We spend an average of 90 per cent of our time indoors, and good indoor air is paramount for our optimum health, wellbeing and productivity. However, indoor air is often contaminated with pollutants from indoor sources, as well as those that have migrated from outdoors, and thus may potentially present a greater risk to our health than outdoor air. This issue of the environmental SCIENTIST examines aspects that are important to understanding how to achieve good indoor air quality. Read about the importance of good indoor air, a monitoring campaign in nurseries and schools, and indoor air quality considerations for companies returning to the office following Covid-19.

  1. Why indoor air quality matters – Claire Holman
  2. The importance of good indoor air quality – Vina Kukadia
  3. Ventilation – Emma Gibbons 
  4. Monitoring indoor air quality – Peter Walsh
  5. The inequality of indoor air quality legislation and assessment criteria – Oliver Puddle 
  6. IAQM’s indoor air quality guidance – Carl Hawkings
  7. Indoor air quality and health – Sani Dimitroulopoulou
  8. Collaborating on assessment, design and management – Chris Rush 
  9. Benzene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Kanan Purkayastha
  10. Outdoor air pollution: its ingress and impact on indoor environments – Vina Kukadia
  11. Back to the office – Carl Hawkings and Marcus Lurvink

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Danielle Kopecky

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We spend an average of 90 per cent of our time indoors, and good indoor air is paramount for our optimum health, wellbeing and...

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